The Police and Society: Touchstone Readings by Victor E. Kappeler
586 pages, $48.95 list
1-57766-417-5
978-1-57766-417-8
Instructor’s Manual available
The Police and Society
Touchstone Readings
Third Edition
The articles in this collection reveal fundamental assumptions about the relationship of the police to society. Articles were selected for both their complementary and their competing natures. They serve as touchstones for one another, measuring and questioning the value of previous conceptions about how policing fits into the broader social context. Many of the articles challenge the methods by which information was acquired, how practices evolved from that information, and the background assumptions that drove the construction of practices and theories.

The editor’s purpose in assembling this provocative volume is to facilitate systematic inquiry—to help readers discover connections, to detect mutual influence, and to trace divergences of opinion. Some of the issues raised include: What is the function of the police? What does “the public” expect of the police institution? How many “publics” are there? Who benefits from police service? How are public safety and social order secured while maintaining individual rights and freedoms? To what extent do our assumptions about the police and society reflect our values and demands? To what extent do the police generate expectations? Is policing at a critical crossroads?

If we analyze the recurring, central themes in policing as informed participants, perhaps our constructions and perceptions will better reflect the dynamic interrelationships between the police and society and the efficacy of those relationships for the future.
Table of Contents
Part I. A HISTORY OF POLICE AND SOCIETY
1. The Evolving Strategy of Policing (George L. Kelling and Mark H. Moore)
2. The Evolving Strategy of Police: A Minority View (Hubert Williams and Patrick V. Murphy)
3. “Broken Windows” and Fractured History: The Use and Misuse of History in Recent Police Patrol Analysis (Samuel Walker)
4. Revising the Histories and Futures of Policing (Victor G. Strecher)
5. The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove (Crime and Social Justice Associates)

Part II. THE ROLE OF THE POLICE IN SOCIETY
6. The Police: Mandate, Strategies, and Appearances (Peter K. Manning)
7. The Capacity to Use Force as the Core of the Police Role (Egon Bittner)
8. Street Justice: A Moral Defense of Order Maintenance Policing (Gary W. Sykes)
9. Street Justice: Some Micro-Moral Reservations (Carl B. Klockars)
10. Broken Windows (James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling)
11. Policing the Contemporary City: Fixing Broken Windows or Shoring Up Neo-Liberalism? (Steve Herbert)

Part III. THE SOCIETY OF POLICE
12. The Quasi-Military Organization of the Police (Egon Bittner)
13. The Informal “Code” of Police Deviancy: A Group Approach to “Blue-coat Crime” (Ellwyn R. Stoddard)
14. People Who Don’t Even Know You (Victor G. Strecher)
15. Kinsmen in Repose: Occupational Perspectives of Patrolmen (John Van Maanen)
16. Discretion in Detectives’ Decision Making and “High Profile” Cases (Marilyn Corsianos)
17. Breeding Deviant Conformity: Police Ideology and Culture (Victor E. Kappeler, Richard D. Sluder, and Geoffrey P. Alpert)

Part IV. POLICING SOCIETY
18. The Asshole (John Van Maanen)
19. Violence and the Police (William A. Westley)
20. Police Accounts of Normal Force (Jennifer Hunt)
21. The Police on Skid-row: A Study of Peace Keeping (Egon Bittner)
22. Dumping: Police-Initiated Transjuridictional Transport of Troublesome Persons (William R. King and Thomas H. Dunn)
23. The Dirty Harry Problem (Carl B. Klockars)
24. To Serve and Pursue: Exploring Police Sexual Violence Against Women (Peter B. Kraska and Victor E. Kappeler)

Part V. THE POLICE IN POSTMODERN SOCIETY
25. Economic Rhetoric and Policing Reform (Peter K. Manning)
26. Third-Party Policing: Theoretical Analysis of an Emerging Trend (Michael E. Buerger and Lorraine Green Mazerolle)
27. Militarizing American Police: The Rise and Normalization of Paramilitary Units (Peter B. Kraska and Victor E. Kappeler)
28. Theorizing Policing: The Drama and Myth of Crime Control in the NYPD (Peter K. Manning)
29. The Myopic Panopticon: The Social Consequences of Policing through the Lens (Stéphane Leman-Langlois)
30. Reinventing the Police and Society: Economic Revolutions, Dangerousness, and Social Control (Victor E. Kappeler and Karen S. Miller)