Human Relations and Corrections
Fifth Edition
The authors of the Fifth Edition of Human Relations and Corrections contend that effective relationships are the key component to correctional successes. The inmate, judge, probation officer, correctional officer, counselor, cleric, warden/superintendent, and others interact to form critical relationships that can either enhance or detract from the rehabilitative and correctional potential of incarcerated offenders, as well as those on probation and parole. This thought-provoking collection of case studies enables the reader to assume each of these roles, engages them in ethical analysis of real-life situations, and immerses them in the complex decision-making processes necessary to solve the problems encountered in today's correctional process.
Table of Contents
Section I. THE COURT AND CORRECTIONS

1. Presentence Investigation: A Fair Shake?
2. Diversion or Subversion?
3. The Court and Child Abuse
4. Probation or Prison?
5. Child Rapist
6. The Court and Wife Battering
7. Juvenile Probation: Boot Camp or Boot Hill?
8. Lost Boys, Inc.

Section II. THE CORRECTIONAL ROLE OF THE COMMUNITY

1. The Minister and the Ex-Offender
2. Corrections in Jail
3. The Correctional Volunteer
4. The Teacher, the Delinquent and the Gang
5. A Family of Offenders
6. The Limits of Responsibility
7. House Arrest or Probation Revocation?
8. Community Corrections for Profit?

Section III. THE INMATE

1. Bust or Parole?
2. Six Months to Go
3. An Expression of Grief
4. Something for Nothing
5. Showdown at Seven o'Clock
6. What’s for Supper?
7. Home Sweet Home
8. The Prison Schoolhouse
9. From Troublemaker to Peacemaker

Section IV. THE CORRECTIONAL OFFICER

1. The First Day
2. A Legacy of Corruption
3. Man in the Middle
4. A Matter of Discretion
5. Elder Abuse
6. A Riot in the Making?
7. A Question of Policy
8. Family Connections

Section V. THE COUNSELOR

1. Wet Behind the Ears
2. Confidentiality or Security?
3. A Captive Audience
4. The Group
5. The Despairing Client
6. Dealing with Anger
7. Counseling a Hostage Victim
8. Suicide by Counselor

Section VI. CORRECTIONAL ETHICS

1. Anyone Want a Job?
2. Who’s Running the Prison?
3. Offender Rights and Public Expectations
4. A Choice of Punishments
5. Sexual Harassment
6. Outsourcing for Profit
7. The Public Has a Right to Know
8. Watch What You Say

Section VII. THE CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATOR

1. Prison Sexuality
2. Progressive Administration, Punitive Community
3. Too Little Supervision or an Unfortunate Incident?
4. Managing a Women’s Prison
5. Where Do You Begin?
6. The Execution Protocol
7. If It’s Not Broken . . .