The Dilemmas of Corrections
Multidisciplinary Perspectives
Fifth Edition
Prisons, as they were established in the United States, were meant to be positive contributions to the new world—institutions in which the idle, the unmotivated, the hooligans, and the cruel were sent to be transformed into active energetic, useful, and kind members of society. Somehow, somewhere, something went wrong. Critics have offered too few constructive solutions for change and too many quick fixes.

The fifth edition of The Dilemmas of Corrections places the major problems of contemporary American corrections in an appropriate philosophical and historical context and offers views on these problems from a variety of academic disciplines. The result is a truly multidisciplinary anthology of readings on the history, theory, and practice of criminal punishment in the United States. The variety of perspectives presented in this collection gives readers a unique, well-rounded presentation of the dilemmas that have always plagued our corrections system. This comprehensive presentation offers a fresh outlook and new insights, not only on the problems themselves, but also on their history and the social, psychological, and political forces that created them and make them extraordinarily difficult to solve. Looking at these problems from a multidisciplinary viewpoint will inspire readers to think about new approaches to these very old and intractable problems.
Reviews
“Great supporting readings to accompany course text and allow students to more deeply and practically explore issues in corrections.” — Heidi Ballard, Otterbein University

“I was glad to see the new edition! I’ve been impressed with the original contents and was even more impressed with the timely updates. This is a great book for advanced undergraduate students. The topics covered are integrated nicely, and presented in a manner that encourages lively debate and discussion. Thank you for a great product!” — Kristy Holtfreter, Florida State University

“A pragmatic, multidisciplinary review of the paramount issues and problems found in the American correctional system. This well-rounded presentation is both refreshing and challenging. Hopefully the students will begin to explore new and innovative alternatives to the age-old issues and problems. Global in its coverage and very readable!” — Robert Rice, Sinclair Community College

“I have been using it since 2001. It goes much further into the actual operational issues of correctional facilities than a regular intro text. The various authors and writing styles keep it ‘fresh’ for the students’ reading assignments.” — Deborah Huck, Washington State Community College

“An excellent corrections reader that improves upon the Fourth Edition. — Richard Lawrence, St. Cloud State University
Table of Contents
Part I. PHILOSOPHICAL JUSTIFICATIONS FOR CRIMINAL PUNISHMENT

1. Punishment as Healing for the Soul (Plato)
2. The Paradox of Punishment (Alan H. Goldman)

Part II. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON PUNISHMENT AND IMPRISONMENT

3. Throwing Away the Key: Imprisonment (Lewis Lyons)
4. Philadelphia, and Its Solitary Prison (Charles Dickens)
5. The Birch and the Lash on Sakhalin Island (Anton Chekhov)

Part III. WHO GOES TO PRISON AND WHY

6. Comparative International Rates of Incarceration: An Examination of Causes and Trends (Marc Mauer)
7. The Criminal Type (Jessica Mitford)
8. Racial Disparity and the Criminal Justice System: An Assessment of Causes and Responses (Marc Mauer)
9. The War on Drugs and the Incarceration of Mothers (Stephanie Bush-Baskette)
10. The Politics of Punishment: Evaluating Political Explanations of Incarceration Rates (Kevin B. Smith)

Part IV. THE REALITIES OF PRISON LIFE

11.Target Violence (Daniel Lockwood)
12. Prowling the Yard: The Public Culture of the Prison (Robert Johnson)
13. Women’s Accounts of Their Prison Experiences: A Retrospective View of Their Subjective Realities (Mark R. Pogrebin and Mary Dodge)
14. “Opening a Vein”: Inmate Poetry and the Prison Experience (Robert Johnson and Nina Chernoff)
15. On Psychological Experiments (Erich Fromm)

Part V. THE COURTS, THE CONSTITUTION, AND CORRECTIONS: COMMENTARY AND KEY CASES

16. Ewing v. California
17. Hudson v. McMillian et al.
18. Bounds, Correction Commissioner, et al. v. Smith et al.
19. Thornburgh, Attorney General of the United States, et al. v. Abbott et al.
20. Superintendent, Massachusetts Correctional Institution at Walpole v. Hill et al.
21. Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole v. Scott

Part VI. REHABILITATION PROGRAMS BEHIND BARS AND IN THE COMMUNITY

22. “What Works?” Revisited: New Findings on Criminal Rehabilitation (James Q. Wilson)
23. From Nothing Works to What Works: Changing Professional Ideology in the 21st Century (Francis T. Cullen and Paul Gendreau)
24. Correctional Boot Camps: Lessons from a Decade of Research (Dale G. Parent)
25. The Effectiveness of Prison-Based Therapeutic Communities for the Treatment of Drug Involved Offenders (James A. Inciardi)
26. Probation and Cognitive Skills (Frederick R. Chavaria)
27. Prisoner Reentry: Public Safety and Reintegration Challenges (Joan Petersilia)
28. The Impact of Victim-Offender Mediation: Two Decades of Research (Mark S. Umbreit, Robert B. Coates, and Betty Vos)

Part VII. CRITICAL PROBLEMS AND ISSUES IN CORRECTIONS

29. The Disturbed Disruptive Inmate: Where Does the Bus Stop? (Hans Toch)
30. Older Inmates: Special Programming Concerns (Peter C. Kratcoski)
31. Prisons for Profit (Eric Bates)
32. The Trouble with “Scarlet Letter” Punishments (Douglas Litowitz)
33. To Kill or Not to Kill . . . For and Against the Death Penalty: The Ultimate Punishment: A Defense (Ernest van den Haag)
34. Why Conservatives Should Oppose the Death Penalty (Kenneth C. Haas)