Rhetoric: Concord and Controversy by Antonio  de Velasco, Melody  Lehn
378 pages, $44.95 list
1-57766-735-2
978-1-57766-735-3
RSA members, please call 847-634-0081 to place your order and receive a 20% discount on Rhetoric: Concord and Controversy!
eBook availability
Rhetoric
Concord and Controversy
In May 2010, more than 1,000 scholars from around the globe gathered for the Rhetoric Society of America’s fourteenth biennial conference to contemplate two of the many dimensions of rhetoric, one divisive and conflictive, the other irenic and unifying. Cicero identified these divergent qualities, while Kenneth Burke took this either/or split personality and transformed it into a space where identification and division are found together, where sameness and diversity embrace the work of rhetoric.

As a product of the conference, Rhetoric: Concord and Controversy offers 32 essays that reflect on this realm of rhetoric and reveals a landscape that is vivid as well as varied, apparent as well as dense. These absorbing and thoughtful contributions ask, among many other things, what are the limits of rhetorical concord? What role does race and gender play in the give-and-take of unity and difference? Is there a viable alternative to agreeing to disagree? How can rhetorical pedagogy respond to the political controversies of today?
Table of Contents
Editors' Introduction

Part I: PLENARY PERSPECTIVES
1. What Shall We Do with the White People? (Sharon Crowley)
2. Concord and Controversy on August 28, 1963 (Jack Selzer)

Part II: PUBLICS, PEDAGOGIES, AND RHETORICAL TENSIONS
3. Constructing Pluralism: Identification and Division in the Political Transformation of Poland (Cezar M. Ornatowski)
4. Rhetoric, Dialectic, and Public Discourse (Michael S. Kochin)
5. Feminist Historiography, Epideictic Rhetoric, and the Kent State Shootings: Controversy, Commemoration, and Culpability (M. Karen Powers)
6. Conflict, Inquiry, and the Narrative Imagination: On the Art of Empathic Reasoning (Zachary Dobbins)
7. Argument Building from Databases: Remediating Invention in a First-Year Writing Course (J. Blake Scott)
8. Bringing Concord Out of Educational Discord by Teaching Political Controversy (Donald Lazere)

Part III: FREEDOM, ETHOS, AND THE RHETORIC OF RIGHTS
9. Internal Discord and "the Signifying Process" in Ethico-Political Rhetoric (Lynn Clarke)
10. Troubled Freedom: The Grounds of Rhetoric and Psychoanalysis (Ira Allen)
11. Adaptive Rhetoric: Ethos and Evolved Behavior in Cicero's De Oratore (Alex C. Parrish)
12. "In the Bonds of Woman and the Slave": Analogy and Collective Identity in Woman's Rights Discourse, 1860–1869 (Jennifer Keohane)
13. When Are Human Rights?: Democratic Anachronism and Obama's Rhetoric of Reproductive Posterity (Megan Foley)
14. Toward a Feminist Theory of Global Citizenship: (Re)contextualizing Social Rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Rebecca A. Kuehl)

Part IV: INVENTION, AMBIGUITY, AND RHETORICAL CONSTRAINT
15. Rhetoric for Avoiding Offense: Insinuatio in French Rhetorical Manuals of the Renaissance (Claudia Carlos)
16. Working for Concord amidst the Controversy: The Role of the Domus in the Circulation of Cicero's "Second Philippic" (Nancy Myers)
17. Andreia in the Nunnery: Rhetorical Learnedness in Twelfth-Century Byzantium (Ellen Quandahl)
18. Rhetorical Translation and the Space between Languages (Rebecca Lorimer)
19. Eiromene and Katestrammene: Styles in Opposition (Kyle Schlett)
20. The Caribbean Conundrum: The Restrictive Liberation of Language, Rhetoric, and Idiom in Anglophone Caribbean Literature (Timothy Henningsen)

Part V: INTERDEPENDENCE, IDENTITY, AND THE RHETORIC OF DISSENT
21. The Rhetoric of Apostasy: Christopher Hitchens at War with the Left (Paul Lynch)
22. Harleys and Angels' Wings: Nonverbal Rhetorical Response to the Westboro Baptist Church (Heather A. Roy)
23. Controversy under Erasure: Memory, Museum Practice, and the Politics of Magnitude (Kelly M. Young and William Trapani)
24. "That We Might Become 'A Peculiar People'": Spatial Rhetoric as a Resource for Identification (Rosalyn Collings Eves)
25. Malcolm X's Apocalyptic Rhetoric: Esteeming the Disparaged Tragic Frame (Keith Miller)

Part VI: ARGUMENT, REASON, AND RHETORICAL THEORY
26. Whately on Pragmatics of Arguing (Beth Innocenti)
27. and the Rhetoric of Rational Religion in Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason and Richard Watson's Apology for the Bible (David C. Hoffman)
28. Augustan Concord, Gothic Controversy, and Models of Empire in The Spectator (Jon Leon Torn)
29. Why Richard Weaver Matters (Patrick Shaw)
30. "To See Our Two Ways at Once": The Correspondence of Kenneth Burke and Paul de Man (Ethan Sproat)
31. Mr. Burke, Meet Helen Keller (Ann George)

Afterword: IN MEMORY OF MICHAEL C. LEFF
32. Momentary Civil Religion in Isocrates' "To Philip" (Steven R. Edscorn)